Mantle with Hummingbird Design

The intricately embroidered wool hummingbirds on this burial shroud suggest that it was made for a high-ranking member of the Nasca society. This brightly colored piece is part of Krannert Art Museum's extensive collection of works from the Americas.

Peru, Nasca (ca. 100 BCE). Mantle with hummingbird design (detail). Cotton, alpaca wool. Gift of Fred Olsen and the Art Acquisition Fund 1967-29-56. Image courtesy of Krannert Art Museum.

Tea Ceremony

Part of Japanese culture in its present form since the sixteenth century, the tea ceremony is graceful and contemplative. The cups, bowls, spoons, and pots are often chosen to reflect the aesthetics of the host, provide pleasing shapes to hold, or surprise guests with unexpected patterns when the tea is gone.

Krannert Center Lobby

Ordinarily Krannert Center's glorious lobby is filled with people for the more than 300 performances held each year. This fall it will be home to classes for the Department of Dance, the Department of Theatre, and the School of Music while public events are suspended.

Berthe Morisot by Édouard Manet

Krannert Art Museum's holdings include more than 10,000 pieces ranging from contemporary works to those dating to 4000 BCE. This lithograph by Édouard Manet is part of its permanent collection of European art.

Édouard Manet (1832–1883), Berthe Morisot, 1872. Lithograph. Gift of James Russell Vaky 2002-1-1. Image courtesy of Krannert Art Museum.

Documenting Inequality

Krannert Art Museum hosts exhibitions from the course Documenting Inequality, which covers topics for undergraduates including cultural understanding, social inequality, and the roles that community-based art can play in making connections between what we glean from the news and lived experience.

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